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of the top contenders for the job, the u.n. ambassador susan rice. dan lothian's noticed the change in tone. dan's joining us now with more. what's the latest on the successor for hillary clinton, dan? >> reporter: that's right. this is senator, john mccain, who had been working to discredit ambassador rice, had been digging in on this, criticizing her, prompting the president at his news conference to say, if they wanted to go after anyone, they should go after him. now there's a noticeable shift and senator mccain says he's ready to listen. from threat tong block her possible nomination to south korea south korea to a willingness to hear her out, senator john mccain seems to be dialing back his public opposition to ambassador susan rice. >> i think she deserves the ability and the opportunity to explain herself and her position. >> reporter: another vocal critic, senator lindsey graham, is still expressing doubts about her but avoided answering whether he would still stand in the way of a rice nomination. >> when she comes over, if she does, there will be a lot of questions asked after he
on the president or miss rice? >> the president is ultimately responsible. >> cnn's dan lothian first reported this morning's meeting with rice and mccain. he joins us now from the white house. dan, rice has not been nominated, not yet. how important are these meetings today? >> it's very important. republicans have been very concerned about the narrative that she put out there shortly after those benghazi attacks. they have a lot of questions and don't feel that this white house and this administration has been very transparent in the process. they have been very critical of her. as you heard the senator pount out there, it was ambassador rice who asked for these meetings. she will be accompanied by acting cia director mike morel. what's interesting is that we've seen some of the harshest criticism has been sort of toned down as we heard there from senator john mccain. from threatening to block her nomination as possible secretary of state to a willingness to hear her out, senator john mccain seems to be dialing back his public opposition to ambassador susan rice. >> i think she deserves the
shows seems to me and to many to be misplaced. >> cnn's dan lothian is at the white house. so, dan, is it even worth -- is it even worth the president nominating susan rice? because there just doesn't seem to be any meeting of the minds about her on the republican side. >> reporter: you're right. i guess it's always possible that the woit house could give up the fight on her but also possible is that if the president believes she is the right person for that position, then i don't think this is something that will move him off of susan rice. but nonetheless, the white house is pushing very hard in defending her, as you pointed out. we should point out again that this is all a hypothetical discussion because the president has not nominated her. nonetheless the white house defend i defending her, saying that she was only acting on information that came from the intelligence community and really that everyone is focused on the wrong thing. what the focus should be on is on what happened in benghazi, who is responsible for it and this those people be brought to justice, carol. >> susan
paper in san diego talking about dan mckennon and it says navy pilot, radio and airline executive, appointed to two federal boards and son of san diego congressman. those are a lot of things but dan was so much more than all of those even put together. first, his father was a democrat congressman from san diego here in the 1950's. probably stood at this table like i am speaking now. dan was a page when we still had pages in the house in the 1950's during the truman administration as well. he had a great respect and love for this country and he had a great respect and love for this body and the institution. he has some great claims to fame. one of those is this -- as a young man, dan served in the navy as a helicopter pilot and he's credited with 62 saves on land or sea. that's more saves during peace time than any other navy pilot in history. he loved the navy and loved flying and that led him to other things in life. he was a great pilot. he was inspired to fly from some words taken from the movie "the bridge over toko" and i will summarize what made him want to be a helicopter p
? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, you know, certain number of people underwater on their mortgages are now in
dog. governor? [applause] and governor hickenlooper, your dear friend and our dear friend, dan gordon could not be here but we wanted to make sure you enjoyed his borough -- brew. >> as i have many times before, let me assure you. [applause] >> our photographer would like to get your photos. >> with or without the kibble? >> all right. >> we love our parks, but we love... >> and the community who is really the core of it all, came together and said what we need is a place for our teenager to play, not just play grounds for the kids and soccer fields but we need a skate park that will keep the kids home in the neighborhood so they can play where they live. >> the children in the neighborhood and it will be a major boone. and we have generations, the youth generations that will be able to use this park in different places. >> the best park in san francisco right here. >> creating place where people can be active and lead, active, healthy life styles that are going to just stay with them for life. ♪ >> here we are at the embarcadero. we are standing at one of locations for the street
dear friend and our dear friend, dan gordon could not be here but we wanted to make sure you enjoyed his borough -- brew. >> as i have many times before, let me assure you. [applause] >> our
life. with me today, dan shah letterman of making change at walmart. carmen wong a personal finance expert and president of ulta wealth management. peter goodman, executive business editor for the huffington post and heather mcgee from the progressive think tank. nice to see you all. >> thanks. >> walmart has said not such a big deal. a couple dozen people walked out. we had record profits. how do you respond to that poo pooing of the labor pushback. >> i wish i could say i was surprised. this is walmart's typical response, to ignore the fact that there are problems inside of the store. hundreds and hups of workers went on strike across the country. they went on strike because walmart continues to illegally retaliate for those who want to speak up and make a change at walmart. these workers went on strike even the days leading up to it when walmart was threatening them with termination, threatening with some being sued for lost revenue. these workers still had the courage to stand up. on top of that, we just saw an incredible outpouring of support from the community that i've never
in this recovery. >> then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- we're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking it up on the spending side. we've agreed -- we haven't agreed but there seems to be a movement toward the idea that some taxes will go up on the high end and the middle class won't see much of a tax increase. are we justified? >> i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and the other guests there. the typical consumer makes about $60,000 a year for their family. they're not getting tax dividends so they're not freaked up about those going up. they're concerned about their paychecks and paychecks have been more steady for the first time in several years, wages have gone up a little bit, and the biggest asset people own is a house. it's not just a volume of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, a certain number of people who are under water on their mortgages are now in positive territory. and that contributes to what we call
haunted by a horrifying past. cnn white house correspondent dan lothian traveled with the president on that trip, and he gives us a chilling look at history. >> reporter: the road to the killing fields on the outskirts of phnom penh is dusty and at times only partly paved. a 30-minute ride into this country's painful past when some 2 million people were killed under pol pot's brutal rule, a man some refer to as the hitler of cambodia. this is the truck stop where people were brought, some from prisons or elsewhere. sometimes it was hundreds by truck each day. some held out hope. others knew it was the end. this is where they came to die. they were all accused of crimes against the state. most were killed the night they arrived here. others were kept alive for a few more hours in small steel and wood structures that were once right here on this spot. this man, who begs for money and food every day along the fence surrounding the killing fields, says his brother was arrested, brought here, and murdered by the khmer rouge. it's sad, he says, while cnn can't verify his account, our tran
up there cadillac an ev. why make all of this vernlgts you talk with dan ackerson says emphatically evs are the future for this industry, maybe not this year, maybe not next year but down the road, why they continue to invest in electric cars. thank you very much, phil lebeau in los angeles for us today. so, what do you think of the electric car? go to finance.yahoo!.com results coming up later on "power lunch." >>> we are watching facebook. the last two weeks, 10%, 25% the past two months. people thinking facebook has turned a corner. julia boorstin is in los angeles with details on that. hi, julia. >> hi, sue. even with some new privacy concerns, things are definitely look up for the social network and the stock is holding on to the gains the last two months. two of wall street's most bearish analysts have turned to bulls, bernstein and btig upgrading the stock in expectation of a surge in mobile ad revenue, facebook has to walk a delicate line. more ads good for the bottom line but could turn off users. facebook survived the biggest lockup explorations without a flood of selling.
phenomenon is the growing sense how can they feel victimized? there is a man named dan who was an activist investor. becoming the ceo of yahoo! but december 2010 he said to be mailed to his friends and the subject heading was battered wives. to except the and abuse of president obama the email says written in the voice of a battered wife he really loves us when he hit the seed is not needed and most of the time the bruises do not show. seriously. another man named tj rogers investor of a semiconductor company said he feels the victim and -- victimization of the super turk -- super rich is so extreme they are like the depressed ethnic minority. the president should be ashamed to treat them this way because he knows what it is like. truth. for the hitler analogy? it is just commonplace. with a carried interest is a particular benefit famously comparing himself to invading poland and then as part of getting my book out there which by the way there are so many parallels with the rise of barack obama and hitler. he said i did not mean to compare them but there are a lot of parallels. it is very
>> good evening everybody. i'm in for dan ashley tonight. we begin with death of veteran actor larry has gone man playing jr on the show dallas. he was in dallas when he passed. recently repricing the role of conniving and conniving oil barren. he was in the television series i dream of jeanie. he died of cancer. dallas co-star linda gray and patrick duffy at his bed sigh. he was 81 years old. >>> in massachusetts tonight several pe injured when an explosion caused by a gas leak ripped through a strip club. firefighters used a ladder, a truck to search for people on the upper floor of one building. the explosion sent brick and glass trying through the downtown street. springfield is an hour west of boston. one witness heard loud explosion before knock down on the other side of the store. >> san bruno family was in a r returning home after a morning of shopping and tonight a family member tells us 2 are dead, 4 others injured along with chp officer. of john with more on holiday tragedy. >> shopping trip ended in a horrifying rollover crash on highway 101 north near embarca
civilization's cal dan ends on this year's winter solstice, december 31st, and there are predictions that the end of the world is imminent. and that's 10 p.m. eastern and 1 a.m. eastern, and super storm sandy are offering opportunities for people out of work and looking to earn a paycheck. a positive side of the story. plus, casey anthony, remember her? she's back in the news. she was acquitted of killing her tot daughter caylee, during a trial. and now a stunning admission by investigators about a crucial mistake they made during the investigation. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we stilneed your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. [ male announcer ] the way it moves. the way it cleans. everything abt the oral-b power brush is simply revolutionary. oral-b power brushe
the president and ceo of general motors, dan ackerson is a known republican is the auto industry working republicans to get support for electric vehicles and if they are, how come they're not more successful? is there an oil lobby on the other side of this? >> certainly the oil industry is very powerful. they are out lobbying but remember 2011, president obama during the state of the union called for increasing that ev tax credit to $10,000 not just making a tax credit but a point of sale refund. so you can get the $10,000 off a volt or a leaf or a tesla at the dealership as opposed to waiting to get it on your tax return but there really hasn't been a big push by auto companies in part for anything because the climate has shifted so much. it is very anti-government spending in general. they're talking about what programs to cut not what programs to add. and the auto companies have not made a real concerted effort to get more funding for evs since the stimulus deal about $2.4 billion for battery plants and electric vehicles.
on private equity. it's an issue we have not talked about yet. joining us now is dan primac of "fortune" magazine. >> good morning. >> so fiscal cliff, does it really matter to the world of private equity? >> it matters to the extent of if we go off of it or run into it depending on your metaphor. everyone feels we go into immediate recession, shock recession. it obviously matters because private equity succeeds or fails based on the portfolio companies in a major recession. private equity's a long-term asset class, it can survive as an industry or asset class. cycles better than most can. in general, i think everyone's kind of optimistic, believes something will get done. but there's nobody hoarding money or freaking out yet. >> what about carried interest? we keep talking about taxes and that's one component of this debate. carried interest sort of went on the table, then went off the table, maybe it comes back on the table. but it's not something we're hearing a lot about now. where do you think that issue stands? >> you know, for a long time, i've thought that the issue just works g
is in front of them. if you go with smaller portions people will tend to eat less. >> reporter: dan lieberman, abc news, new york. >> all that piece did was make me hungry. that's all. but we have food here for the staff tonight. you didn't have a plate? >> i did. when you were done i go by. i don't eat breakfast. this is early for me. it's smelling too good. i got myself a plate. >> mac and cheese. the meat. >> couldn't help it. you'll have more later on. another meal later on. you keep eating right? >> 'tis the season. the holiday spirit right there. i knew you would sneak back there. had a feeling. >> i did. i did. >>> all right. well, "the skinny" is coming up next with a shocker involving a hollywood starlet. is there yet another sex tape about to surface? >> please, no. plus, also, a peek inside madonna's big apple abode. you're watching "world news now." we'll have it when you come back. >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our ♪ skinny so skinny >>> welcome back, everybody. i know it is a holiday and all, we should be more family friendly perhaps. but there is ne
history. >> there's more counterfeiting going on in china now than we've ever seen anywhere. >> dan chow should know. a law professor at ohio state university, his specialty is chinese counterfeiting. we know that 15% to 20% of all goods in china are counterfeit. >> and these days, the way china's economy is booming, 15% to 20% means tens of billions of dollars. evidence of the counterfeiting trade can be seen at this hong kong warehouse where counterfeit watches, shoes, computer chips, all copied in china, and seized in hong kong, are tossed onto a conveyor belt, and consigned to the dust bin of history. but it's like stopping the rain, the seizure may look impressive, but every day, 6,000 shipping containers leave hong kong's harbor for the u.s. packed with products made in china, and only a small fraction of those containers are ever inspected. >> this is the most profitable criminal venture, as far as i know, on earth. >> counterfeiting. >> counterfeiting. and your partners don't kill you. >> attorney harley lewin has been chasing counterfeiters from china for more than twenty years.
off today with gains across the board. dan greenhouse, chief global strategist joins us. i know you're a fan of history. is the santa claus rally a real thing or just an urban legend? >> it's a real thing. >> buy stocks now and sell them new year's eve. >> lots of sayings on wall street tend to be not accurate. the concept of santa claus rally is one of the few that are true. modest outperformance from christmas to january 1st, january 2nd. stock traders almanac would define it first two days of the year as well. you see this year after year. the question for investors this year is whether or not the fiscal cliff gets in the way. in the context of what's happening with black friday, it's a really interest question. think the answer is yes. it does get in the way. >> we never had a fiscal cliff before. >> we're talking about black friday. black friday isn't the holiday shopping season. dana was on cnbc all morning. i'm sure she would agree. most shopping occurring as you get closer to christmas and then maybe saturday or sunday before is the peak. >> no one will make up to the perils
want to thank you the program organizers for bring this together. dan has written a wonderful book and i think that you'll be impressed with what he's put together in the celebration of prohibition and the antiprohibition movement. it's an exciting time to talk about prevention for the reason that the election has been questioned the antiprovision before us all over again. in addition to develop initiative in colorado and washington, we also have in massachusetts and the new announcements and our island and maine the legislators and those of us in the jurisdiction to get the question of decriminalization of marijuana for recreational use. so, the question of the day i think is what lessons can we draw from provision for today's? >> the first 1i think we all know prohibition was a terrible failure. despite the best we have to remind ourselves the good reasons. it was a very drunken country. the efforts didn't succeed. every society were no one could see that because if there is part of the world that wants something and another part wants to try at it will be provided and that is th
to the upside. >> of course, dan, everyone has said if there's this idea that washington can come together and define some sort of solution, that will make the markets buy into this confidence in washington. washington has big problems, and the solutions are probably going to mean painful medicine around. is there a moment when the markets wake up and realize and say, oh, my gosh, we have to realize we are talking about spending cuts, higher taxes and combination of these two things could lead to some troubling times for the markets too? >> well, that's going to be found out once the deal is in. let's say they had some sort of a deal and you start breaking it down. you'll have to look at how is it going to impact the economy? i imagine they're going to do it to minimize whatever impact there is. it seems to me, there's growth in this economy and we're looking for a place to spring board from it. so they're not going to want to ruin that chance. but until the details are out, we're really not going to want to know. >> we have not talked fiscal cliff with you in-depth on these things. what i
, there is also a dan malloy who passed major legislation earlier this year in connecticut. where there is a john king, there is also a kevin hougher in. now the lines have blurred even more. i think kevin is a democrat working for a republican governor. this is even truer in the electorate. you saw washington state, which i mentioned, georgia, approve charter schools for the first time. the voters in indiana out ofed tony bennett, voters in indianapolis approved reform minded candidates for school board who were supported by democrats for education reform. i know indianapolis is not synonymous with indiana. i grew up in chicago. but it strikes me as a complication in the traditional coalition. maybe it's urban versus suburban. it might also have to do with organization and the fact that the public may support part of the reform agenda. not other parts. some candidates but not others. so reforms have to get down deep at the ground level and fight the local battle and create broad, center based coalitions to win these fights. fourth, my class point, is that implementation is key. we've got to get
of what moral envision as dan pointed out in his chapter in the book he had edited commemorating the passage of the morel act that we're celebrating the 150th anniversary this year, and say his vision was for liberal education as well as toll tal yaren and as the american research university e americaed from the classical -- and the science and technology certainly science and technology draws more federal support, but without the humanities and -- there is just absolutely extraordinary work being done in the humanities which informs our intellectual culture, it's pervasive, i think it's just not as -- it doesn't produce the breakthrough technology as you said that the nano technology cousin. >> do the panelists think that the humanities are getting the short end of the stick. are they just jealous of the new buildings for the engineering college? >> i think that there's no question they feel downtrodden. in reality, if you look at the fundamental purpose of the university education, although we have the vocational focus right now sometimes said that the purpose of the college ed
for the pardon of richard nixon. but he was given a current award before his dad dan tow. it was an unbelievable -- courage award before his death. it was an unbelievable honor for him. [applause] at the time, woodward and bernstein criticized, but he knew in the long run it was the right thing to do and for our nation to heal, it had to happen. if we were going to take a president and go through the whole ross s, -- of the whole process, our country would not be where it is today. that is one of them. the things my mother did as far as bringing press counselor out of the closet and doing so much for women -- [applause] and women oppose the health issues. it was also later after they left the white house in what she did for drug and alcohol addiction. [applause] those are the things that stand out in my mind. the bicentennial, lynda mentioned 1976. the you're the bicentennial was an unbelievable experience. -- the year of the bicentennial was and am a believable experience -- an unbelievable experience. the tall ships were amazing. it made you proud to be an american. >> we are going to take som
of cornell and the current trustee of the state university of new york. dan convened our symposium and is a past president of the university of vermont. jim is the president emeritus of the university of michigan who put the michigan people together. pete is the head of the association of public and land grant universities and also the past president of michigan state. i think governance is a big issue now. over the last year, we have seen a lot of public university presidents founder in some way. it makes you wonder if it is a doable job. shortly after the fiasco at the university of virginia, i was talking to a lot of past and present public research university people probably the most passionately frustrated of them is, who is now at a private university in florida but is the past president at the university of wisconsin. she said, it was so much easier to run the department of health and human services, which is huge, and the university of wisconsin because i have some power. i could do something. as a public university had, we do not have any power. we are just tugboat talk to
. >> there are just five weeks until the fiscal cliff takes place. agricultural secretary dan goodman talks about efforts in congress to create a bipartisan agreement. from washington journal this is 40 minutes. >> is right after an election the best time to heed calls on citizenship. ? more ground be gained? >> well, think the president hass more choices. the public gave president obama a clear victory. congress is divide although the democrats picked up some seats in both places. if elections have consequences, wouven the consequences is the public has spoken. it's up to the legislative body and the president to work together like the fis cliff and the deficit. there's no better time to get a kick in the rear ends than after an election. >> you wrote a brees the democrats and the republicans agree. you looked at area where is you see agreement. as we head into this lame duck session and look at system of the big economic things on the table, do you see places that there are an agreement? >> you think we can easily win agreement. the issue of taxes and deficits and spending cuts. i mean, you've
weeks. the state of florida is on the low end. host: this was updated november 2of 2012. welcome, dan. you're on the air. caller: good morning. this is another extension of the entitlement society. we would not have to have this continued discussion about how long people have been on unemployment. it is more of the entitlement society. i believe that romney cost himself the election by making comment.n i think 30% of the country thinks they should be able to sit around and not do anything. what has the president done? passing nationalized health care. everybody who has a brain in their head understands nationalize health care has not worked in europe and canada and it will not work here in the united states. guest: i take issue with a couple of points. this is an entitlement society. i am glad my mother was able to get social security and medicare. she earned it and she got it. i'm sure the seniors feel they paid into the system and the earned it. payments are made into the system based on work that individuals do. when they lose their jobs, they get this insurance. they get what they
. jenna: dan, what do you think about that? if these people do not get benefits and they can't participate in the economy, they can't go christmas shopping. what about that point of view? >> i'm simply looking at the empirical evidence. i guess you could call it a tough love approach. if people get these unemployment benefits, they sort of figure i can hold out for a better job, i can wait a little longer to wait for a job. heck, i've known people that have used unemployment benefits as basically an excuse not to get a job for 13, 26 weeks, whatever the period was. now, obviously, if you find an example of a family with a couple of kids, that's a lot harder, harder-luck story than just some single guy goofing his way off through life -- jenna: like the guys you went to college with. no, i'm just going to leave it there. unfortunately, christian, i'll give you the first response next time because i'd love to have you both back to talk about this, and this is an important issue. thank you both very much. >> thank you. jenna: we'll be right back. ♪ [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do
. be there was ted bush there was a dan ma low. where there's a john king there's a -- [inaudible] now the lines are blurring even more. i think kevin is a democrat working for a republican governor. this is even truer in the elector rate. you saw washington state, and georgia approve charter schools for the first time. the voters in indiana -- voters in indianapolis approved reform minded candidates for school board that were supported by democrats for education. i know, in indianapolis it's enormous with indiana i did group in chicago i'm familiar with the state. it strikes me as a comp indication i think it might have to do with organization and the fact that the public support part reform agenda on other part some candidates but not others. so reformers have to get down deep at the ground level and fight the local battle and create rawed center base coalitions to win these fights. fourth, my last point is that imflexation is key. we have to get the big reforms right if the public is to accept future. the common core standard are [inaudible] in content and teaching strategy. let's focus on en
of everyday and i have a fixed format. maybe they are on an iphone or dan android pc. you want to give each person the best possible handful of pieces of content for them at that time. that is a growing problem. it is during free quickly and we believe it is important to solve. there is a bunch of machine learning, a bunch of infrastructure to assemble for each person. one thing i think about this is your publishing for each of $1 billion ever met. in needs to stab today. there is a model that tries to project is most likely to get air active with optimizing -- news feed optimizes what they would like to interact with. what will create a consumer of between the publisher and consumer? that is the high level. >> you think about how that system works for. lettis positive feedback. you'll get more of that thing. how do you tweak the algorithms so people ill don't show up -- it is a personalized newspaper. how do you now the difference between how they interact. people want to have both interactive, one more often but they want to see the other one and check it out occasionally. >> the main thi
itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and ch
and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition and jealousy, and the. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the culture of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at the school that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. hi also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. .ased in london i recommend it highly for students. think about an international assignment. there are very few things as challenging. people do not know, c
to thank my colleague, dan rothschild here who helped bring this all together. he's had an interest in this issue for a long time, as have i and it's timely and important that we start talking about these things. there's been a tension at the heart of the conservative movement's approach to immigration for at least as long as i've followed politics and a lot longer than that. there are two influential camps that have jockeyed to define the right approach to immigration policy. this will be accrued generalization, but i believe a fair one. on the one hand there are economic libertarians. they don't mind so much the presence of large numbers of immigrants here in the united states illegally. and they would also welcome much more legal immigration as well. we can call this the "wall street journal" wing. on the other hand there's social and law and order conservatives, who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and the maintenance of social order. to these conservatives the presence of large numbers of people in the united states and in violation of american law is inh
this question -- why does dan lungren want me to die? as did a 19-year-old. who indicated that he had suffered some paralysis from an accident. as did a 40-year-old woman, approximately, for some disease she had. stunning. stunning. only thing i could see on the other side of the philosophical divide would be someone who is an army vet, having been paralyzed, sitting in a wheelchair, looking in -- at the camera, saying about a member who had voted against a defense bill, why do you want me to die? why do you want me to be in a wheelchair? in either case the civility is out the window. the ability to talk about an issue that is underlying it is last -- is lost. in the example i gave, the question would be was an appropriate level of funding for defense, were there certain problems with the defense bill? not do you want this veteran to die? in the case that i cited in which i was the subject of that ad, the issue was embreeon exstem cell research. embryonic stem cell research. not the question of what is the ethical thing to do in a very difficult circumstance. former president george w. bush ha
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